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A SUMMARY OF
THE CASE BOOK OF
SHERLOCK HOLMES

 
The Illustrious Client

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

THE ILLUSTRIOUS CLIENT, although never named, it is strongly inferred to be  King George V (the story is dated by Watson as 1911)
SIR JAMES DAMERY, agent for the illustrious client who brought Holmes into the  case, procured the sample of Chinese pottery, and took Gruner's diary after  Holmes had obtained it.
GENERAL de MERVILLE, father of ...
VIOLET de MERVILLE, fiancée of ...
BARON ADELBERT GRUNER, a notorious collector of women.  He murdered one  of his wives but made it look like an accident and was never prosecuted.
SHINWELL "PORKY" JOHNSON, an ex-con gone straight who is a snitch for  Holmes.
KITTY WINTER, a former mistress of Gruner who is now a ruined, soiled dove  because of his treatment of her.
SIR LESLIE OAKSHOTT, a surgeon who attended Holmes after he was beaten by  Gruner's minions.
LOMAX, librarian who got Watson information about Chinese pottery.
DR. HILL BURTON, Watson's alias when he called on Gruner.

SUMMARY

Gruner has completely infatuated Violet and has explained away all of his past love affairs (which have become public).

General de Merville has been very loyal to the crown and the king wishes to spare Violet the heartbreak which a marriage to Gruner is sure to produce, so he has Damery hire Holmes to put some sense into Violet's head so she will break her engagement.

Holmes in turn engages Shinwell who turns up Kitty.  Kitty and Holmes meet with Violet but Gruner has brain washed her well and Violet feels that Kitty herself caused the end of her affair with Gruner and that Kitty's case is her own doing.

Gruner hires a pair of assassins to murder Holmes.  Only Holmes' boxing/single-stick skills save his life.  Holmes has his surgeon, Oakshott, and Watson tell the press that he is at death's door and his life despaired for.

Holmes learns from Kitty that Gruner has a very private diary in which he brags about all of his former love affairs.  He keeps this diary in an inner study.

Gruner is also an avid collector of ancient Chinese pottery.

Damery acquires a rare piece of Chinese pottery which Holmes gives to Watson.  Watson has crammed about Chinese pottery and visits Gruner pretending that he wants to sell his collection.  This engages Gruner's attention long enough that Holmes can burglarize the inner study and steal the secret diary.

Gruner sees through Watson's façade, deduces that he is an agent of Holmes and enters his inner study just as Holmes is getting away through the window.  Gruner attempts to follow Holmes through the window but Kitty, who has been hiding in the shrubbery, throws vitriol in his face, maiming and disfiguring him for life. 

Holmes gives the diary to Damery and Violet, confronted with indisputable evidence, now sees that Gruner is truly evil and breaks her engagement.  Holmes is charged with burglary and Kitty with vitriol throwing.  The illustrious client gets the charges dropped against Holmes and gets Kitty off with the lightest possible sentence.

OTHER ADVENTURES MENTIONED

1. Sir George Lewis and the Hammerford Will case.
2. Moriarity.
3. Col. Sebastian Moran.
4. Charlie Peace, the violin virtuoso.
5. Wainwright the artist.

DISGUISES

None.

UNUSUAL DEDUCTIONS & bits

1.  When Holmes is burglarizing the study, his head is "swathed in bloody bandages," although his injuries are over a week old.
3.  "In some ways [it] was the supreme moment of [Holmes] career."

Official Abbreviation: ILLU

The Adventure Of The Illustrious Client was first published in Collier's Weekly, November 8th, 1924

The Blanched Soldier

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

JAMES M. DODD, recently of the Middlesex corps of the Imperial Yeomen.
COL. EMMSWORTH, retired from the army, the Boer War.
OLD RALPH, long-time butler in the colonel's household.
RALPH'S WIFE, she nursed Godfrey.
MR. KENT, personal physician to Godfrey.
SIR JAMES SAUNDERS, prominent dermatologist.
BALDY SIMPSON and ANDERSON, soldiers who were with Godfrey when he was wounded.

SUMMARY

The story is told by Holmes.  Watson is married.  Godfrey thinks he has contracted leprosy and is kept in isolation on his father's country estate.  Dodd attempts to visit him but is sent packing by the Colonel.  Dodd engages Holmes' services.  Holmes solves the case from his arm-chair and brings Sir James with him on a visit to Godfrey.  Sir James finds that Godfrey suffers from icthiosis and not leprosy.

OTHER ADVENTURES MENTIONED

The Abbey School - "In which the Duke of Greyminster was so deeply involved."

DISGUISES

None.

UNUSUAL DEDUCTIONS & bits

None

Official Abbreviation: BLAN

The Adventure Of The Blanched Soldier was first published in the Liberty Magazine, October 16th 1926

The Mazarin Stone

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

BILLY, the page
PRIME MINISTER
HOME SECRETARY
LORD CANTLEMERE, pompous lord who had no faith in Holmes' ability and was  opposed to hiring him.
COUNT NEGRETTO SYLVIUS, half-Italian, big game hunter, the thief
SAM MERTON, a boxer, confidant to Sylvius
STRAUBENZEE, made the air gun.
VAN SEDDER, ship captain who planned to take the stone to Amsterdam and cut it  into smaller stones.
TAVERNER, French model maker who made the mannequin of Holmes.
YONGHAL. One of the Scotland Yard men that Holmes tells Watson to contact.   He is with the C.I.D.
IKEY SANDERS, a diamond fence.
.
SUMMARY

Watson is not living at Baker Street and Holmes deduces that he is a very busy practitioner. 

A crown jewel, the Mazarin stone, has been stolen and Holmes is trying to recover it. (£ 100,000)

Watson leaves to get the police and is not seen again.  There is a mannequin of Holmes by the window.  Holmes gets Sylvius and Merton to discuss the whereabouts of the stone while they believe he is in the bedroom playing the violin.  Actually it is a gramophone playing the music and Holmes has taken the place of the mannequin.  Holmes slips the recovered stone into Cantlemere's pocket and teases him therewith.

OTHER ADVENTURES MENTIONED

Old Baron Dowson, who said of Holmes, "What the law has gained, the stage has lost."

Old Mrs. Harold.  She left Count Sylvius the Blymar estate.  The count quickly gambled it away.

Miss Minnie Warrender, who was done in by the count.

DISGUISES

Workman looking for a job.
Old woman

UNUSUAL DEDUCTIONS & bits

1. The story is told in the third person.  Watson is not the narrator.

2. Many of the devices in the story have been used before: the bust in the window, the air gun, the villainous big game hunter, Holmes starving himself, dropping the stone into Cantlemere's pocket.  This is not one of the better stories.  It may be a work of fiction.

3.  The stone was named for Cardinal Jules Mazarin.

Official Abbreviation: MAZA

The Adventure of the Mazarine Stone was first published in the Strand Magazine, October 1921

The Three Gables

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

STEVE DIXIE, a bruiser in the employ of Stockdale.
YOUNG PERKINS, murdered by Dixie.
BARNEY STOCKDALE, a small-time hoodlum.
SUSAN STOCKDALE, wife of Barney who works as a maid for Mary Maberly.
MORTIMER MABERLY, a former client of Holmes, now deceased.
MARY MABERLY, widow of Mortimer who occupies Three Gables.
DOUGLAS MABERLY, son of Mortimer and Mary.  Now deceased.
MR. SUTRO, Mary's lawyer.
LANGDALE PIKE, a dealer in gossip who writes for the tabloids.
ISADORA KLEIN, a wealthy widow who had an affair with Douglas.
DUKE OF LOMBARD, engaged to Isadora.
FERGUSON, a retired sea captain from whom Mrs. Maberly bought Three Gables.

SUMMARY

Watson is not living at Baker Street, but is visiting Holmes.

Dixie barges into their rooms and attempts to intimidate Holmes who says that he will convict him of the murder of young Perkins if he does not leave.

Mary has consulted Holmes - she knew of him because he had done some work for her late husband - because of a strange offer she has received.  A house agent has approached her with an offer to buy her house and furniture for a princely sum.  When she has Sutro look over the agreement he tells her that it is worded in such a manner that she cannot even take her personal effects from the house. 

Douglas was a promising young diplomat assigned to and living in Italy.  There he met Isadora and had an affair with her.  She wished to end it but he did not.  He was devastated, took to drink and died of pneumonia.  Before his death, Douglas wrote a novel describing their affair in graphic detail.  There were two copies of the novel's manuscript.  Douglas gave Isadora one of them but died before he could take the other copy to a publisher.  Isadora is now engaged to the Duke of Lombard and the appearance of this novel would create a scandal.

The other copy of the novel is among Douglas' effects which have just arrived from Italy.  Isadora wishes to buy the house to destroy the manuscript.  When Mary refuses her offer, she has Stockdale and his gang break into her house and steal it.  She then burns it.

Holmes learns the sordid details from Pike.  He confronts Isadora who reminds him that she tried all legitimate means before resorting to theft.  Holmes has Isadora make out a check to Mary so that Mary can take a trip around the world.
 

OTHER ADVENTURES MENTIONED

None.

DISGUISES

None.

UNUSUAL DEDUCTIONS & bits

The Langdale Pikes are actually two hills in Westmoreland overlooking Wordsworth's Grasmere.

Several prominent Sherlockians feel because of the way Holmes treats Steve Dixie and the way he treats Isadora, that this is a spurious work of fiction.  Besides would anyone actually be named "Langdale Pike?" 

Official Abbreviation: 3GAB

The Adventure Of The Three Gables was first published in the Liberty Magazine, September 18th 1926

The Sussex Vampire

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

ROBERT FERGUSON, tea broker of Cheeseman's, Lamberly
MORRISON, MORRISON & DODD, legal firm who referred Ferguson to Holmes.
MRS. FERGUSON, a Peruvian whom Ferguson met on a trip to Peru when buying  nitrates.
DOLORES, long time companion and servant of Mrs. Ferguson.
MRS. MASON, nursemaid to Ferguson infant.
FERGUSON INFANT
JACKIE, son of Ferguson by a former marriage, 15 years old, crippled by a  childhood injury.

SUMMARY

Watson is living at Baker St.

Ferguson was married twice and Jackie was from his first wife.  He was extremely devoted to his father.  Mrs. Ferguson was found sucking blood from her infant's neck.  She was actually sucking poison from a wound which Jackie had made with a dart dipped in curare.  Ferguson had brought the darts etc. as mementos of his visit to Peru and also to make his wife feel more at home.   Holmes solved the case before he even left Baker street.

OTHER ADVENTURES MENTIONED

1. The case of Matilda Briggs.  This was a ship, not a woman, and was associated  with the giant rat of Sumatra - a story for which the world is not yet prepared.
2. The voyage of The Gloria Scott.
3. Victor Lynch, the forger.
4. The case of the venomous lizard.
5. Vittoria the circus belle.
6. Vanderbilt and the Yeggman.
6. Vigor, the Hammersmith wonder.

DISGUISES

None.

UNUSUAL DEDUCTIONS & bits

1. On several occasions Holmes "makes a note."  Since the points are either obvious or extremely important, we must assume they are mental notes.
2. The dog is partially paralyzed and Holmes assumes Jackie has been practicing with his blow-gun.
3. "My instinct felt the presence of those weapons upon the wall before my eyes ever saw them."

Official Abbreviation: SUSS

The Adventure Of The Sussex Vampire was first published in the Strand Magazine, January 1924

The Three Garridebs

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

NATHAN GARRIDEB, eccentric, reclusive collector.
JAMES WINTER, alias JOHN GARRIDEB, (a lawyer from Kansas), alias MORECROFT, alias KILLER EVANS
ALEXANDER HAMILTON GARRIDEB, fictitious rich wheat trader, invented by  Winter.
DR. LYSANDER STARR, fictitious former mayor of Topeka, invented by Holmes
HOWARD GARRIDEB, fictitious constructor of agricultural implements, invented by  Winter.
HOLLOWAY & STEELE, house agents who rented Nathan Garrideb's flat to him.
RODGER PRESCOTT, famous forger, constructed the counterfeit plates which  were the reason for the Garrideb fabrication.  He was killed by Winter in a  fight over a card game.

SUMMARY

Prescott has a counterfeiting plant in a secret basement of his flat.  He is killed and Winter is sent to jail.  While Winter is incarcerated, the flat is rented to Nathan Garrideb who never leaves it.  After his release, Winter fabricates the story that A. H. Garrideb has willed his fortune to the first three adult male Garridebs to claim it.  He puts an ad in a Liverpool paper claiming to be Howard Garrideb, in an effort to get Nathan out of his apartment so he can get the counterfeit money and the plates from which they were printed.  Holmes sees through his plan and lies in wait for him, capturing him when he has revealed the plates and counterfeit money.

OTHER ADVENTURES MENTIONED

Holmes refused a knighthood - perhaps his services "can one day be described."

DISGUISES

None

UNUSUAL DEDUCTIONS & bits

None

Official Abbreviation: 3GAR

The Adventure Of The Three Garridebs was first published in Collier's Weekly, October 25th 1924

The Problem of Thor Bridge

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

NEIL GIBSON, ex-American Senator from some Western state and an extremely  wealthy gold magnate.
MARIA GIBSON nee PINTO, the murder victim and wife of Neil.
GRACE DUNBAR, governess to the Gibson children.
SGT. COVENTRY, local policeman who investigated the murder.
MARLOW BATES, secretary to Gibson.
MR. FERGUSON, assistant to Bates.
MR. JOYCE CUMMINGS, barrister representing Miss Dunbar.

SUMMARY

Watson is living in Baker Street.  Billy is on duty.

Gibson and his wife are middle aged.  Although Maria was a raving beauty when she was younger, her physical charms are fading. 

Grace is hired to be governess.  She is an absolutely stunning young woman and Gibson falls head over heels in love with her.  Grace spurns Gibson's physical advances and maintains their relationship platonic. 

Maria is insanely jealous and tries to force Grace to leave.  She does not do so for two reasons: other people are depending on her for financial aid and she feels she can induce Neil into great works of philanthropy.

Maria suicides and attempts to make it look like Grace murdered her.

Holmes sets things straight.

OTHER ADVENTURES MENTIONED

1. Mr. Jason Phillimore   who came out of his house one morning, returned for his  umbrella and was never seen again.
2. The Cutter Alacia which turned into a small patch of mist and was never seen  again.
3. Isadora Persano, noted duelist and journalist who was found one day, stark  raving mad, staring into a match box which contained a worm of a type unknown to science.

DISGUISES

None

UNUSUAL DEDUCTIONS & bits

1. Watson tells his readers that he has deposited at Cox & Co., Charing Cross, a dispatch box containing voluminous notes on other Cases in which Holmes was involved.  Unfortunately this building and the box were destroyed in World War II.

2. Holmes tells Gibson "My fees are upon a fixed scale.  I never vary them, except when I remit them altogether."

Official Abbreviation: THOR

The Problem of Thor Bridge was first published in the Strand Magazine in 2 parts, February and March, 1922

The Creeping Man

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

PROFESSOR PRESBURY, 61 year old physiologist with an  international  reputation. 
ALICE MORPHY PRESBURY, his wife and his junior by about 40 years.
EDITH PRESBURY, his daughter and engaged to...
TREVOR "JACK" BENNETT, Prof. Presbury's professional assistant and  personal secretary.
PROFESSOR MORPHY, holds the chair of comparative anatomy and is Prof.  Presbury's colleague and father-in-law.
ROY. the Presbury's wolfhound
H. LOWENSTEIN, physiologist in Prague who supplied the serum to  Presbury via the agent...
A. DORAK, Lowenstein's agent in London.  A Bohemian with a large general  store.
MERCER. an assistant of Holmes who does some of the leg work.
MACPHAIL, able-bodied coachman of the Presburys

SUMMARY

Watson is married and has a busy practice.  He says this was one of Holmes' last cases (Sept. 1903) and that the facts have been in the dispatch box for over 20 years. 

Holmes is considering writing a monograph on dogs in detective work, not for tracking, but because a dog reflects the attitude of a family: a happy family has a happy dog, a dangerous family has a dangerous dog etc.

Holmes has been contacted by Bennett and says that Roy has attacked Professor Presbury on several occasions before being banished to the barn.  Roy attacks no one else and is otherwise quite manageable.

Professor Presbury fell in love with his colleague's daughter and she reluctantly agreed to marry him.  After the marriage, the professor disappeared for two weeks and would not tell any one where he had been, but one of his former students told Bennett that he had seen him in Prague.

The professor has been radically different after his return: combative, more physical etc.  "A shadow darkened his higher qualities."  He is seen creeping about on all fours (Hence the title, clever, huh?)

Holmes deduces that he has been taking a rejuvenating serum manufactured from Langur monkeys by Lowenstein and supplied to Presbury via Dorak.  Just after taking the serum, the professor is quite ape-like for an interval of several hours and likes to tease the dog.  Finally the dog gets loose and attacks him.  Fortunately, Holmes, Watson and Bennett are on hand to pull them apart.

Holmes says he will write Lowenstein and tell him he will be held responsible for the criminal effects of his serum.  No further epilogue is available.

OTHER ADVENTURES MENTIONED

The Copper Beeches

DISGUISES

None

UNUSUAL DEDUCTIONS & bits

Holmes telegraphs to Watson: "Come at once if convenient.  If inconvenient, come all the same."

Watson says, "I was a whetstone for his mind."

Holmes is considering a monograph on dogs in detective work.

Holmes and Watson stay at the Chequers Inn in Camford.

"When one tries to rise above nature, one is liable to fall below it."

Official Abbreviation: CREE

The Adventure Of The Creeping Man was first published in the Strand Magazine, March 1923

The Lion's Mane

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

HAROLD STOCKHURST, Holmes' neighbor and master of a private school.
FITZROY McPHERSON, science master at the school.  Secretly engaged to  Maude.
IAN MURDOCH, math teacher at the school.  Former suitor of Maude.
ANDERSON, the village constable.
MAUDE BELLAMY, the local beauty and daughter of ...
TOM BELLAMY, owner of a boat livery
WILLIAM BELLAMY, son of Tom who is co-owner of the livery.
FITZROY'S UNCLE, a rich dying man.  Fitzroy is his sole heir.
THE LION'S MANE, Cyanea capillata, a stinging jellyfish.

SUMMARY

Holmes is living in retirement in Sussex.  He and Stackuurst are walking along the high chalk cliff which borders the ocean when McPherson comes staggering toward them.  He is dying and his last words are, "The lion's mane."  His torso is covered with welts, "as from a fine wire scorge."

Holmes discovers that McPherson is engaged to Maude.  They have kept their engagement a secret because Maude gets no encouragement from either Tom or William and because Fitzroy's uncle would disinherit him if he were to become engaged without his consent.  Holmes is very impressed with Maude - almost as with Irene Adler.

Fitzroy's dog, who has been haunting the seashore at the site of his mater's death, dies in a manner very similar to McPherson.

Murdoch has been searching the shore of the crime scene and decides to explore aquatically.  He staggers into Holmes' house in a state of collapse.  Simultaneously, Holmes has independently solved the case!  The killer is a huge jellyfish.  Murdoch quickly recovers from his injuries.

Holmes finds the culprit caught in a tidal pool and smashes it with a boulder.

OTHER ADVENTURES MENTIONED

None.

DISGUISES

None.

UNUSUAL DEDUCTIONS & bits

1. The story is told in the first person by Holmes.

2. It seems preposterous that nobody in the entire town would recognize a jellyfish attack.  In spite of this, Doyle himself was very fond of the story.

Official Abbreviation: LION

The Adventure of the Lion's Mane was first published in the Liberty Magazine, November 27th 1926

The Veiled Lodger

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

MRS. EUGENIA ROUNDER, the veiled lodger.
MR. ROUNDER, deceased.  Husband of Eugenia.
LEONARDO, strongman, acrobat and lover of Eugenia.
GRIGGS, the clown.  Friend of Eugenia.
SAHARA KING, a magnificent lion owned by the Rounders.
MRS. MERRILEW, Eugenia's landlady.
YOUNG EDMUNDS, investigated the death of Mr. Rounder.

SUMMARY

Watson is not living at Baker St.

Mrs. Merilew visits Holmes at Eugenia's request. 

Eugenia has been a lodger at Mrs. Merrilew's for seven years; her face is horribly mutilated and she wears a heavy veil.  She feels she is near death and wants to tell the facts of her husband's murder to someone who will understand.  Holmes had investigated this murder at the request of Edmunds but could not solve it.

Holmes and Watson visit Eugenia who tells them the following story.

Rounder had a circus.  Eugenia married him in a weak moment.  He was a huge man and a terrible bully who beat his wife savagely.  All pitied her.  She fell in love with Leonardo and the two of them planned her husband's murder. 

Leonardo fashioned a club shaped like a lion's claw.  When Rounder and Eugenia went to feed the lion in the evening as was their custom, Leonardo hit Rounder in the back of the head, crushing his skull and leaving the mark of a lion.  Eugenia turned the lion loose, planning to give the impression it had escaped.  Since she did tricks in the show with the lion every night, she did not fear it.  But the lion smelled fresh human blood which enraged it and when it was released, it turned on Eugenia and mauled her face.  Leonardo could have prevented her mauling but he fled in panic and was never seen again.  She wanted to tell the facts to clear her conscience.

She planned to suicide, but Holmes talked her out of it and she sent him via post the bottle of prussic acid she had planned to consume.

OTHER ADVENTURES MENTIONED

The politician, the lighthouse and the trained cormorant.

DISGUISES

None.

UNUSUAL DEDUCTIONS & bits

Holmes and Watson lunch on cold partridge and Montrachet.

Official Abbreviation: VEIL

The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger was first published in the Liberty Magazine, January 22th 1927

Shoscombe Old Place

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

SIR ROBERT NORBURTON, an adventuresome raiser of race horses.
LADY BEATRICE FALDER, Sir Robert's sister who lives with him at Shoshcomb and raises prize-winning spaniels.
JOHN MASON, head trainer for Sir Robert.  Brought the case to Holmes.
CARRIE EVANS, maid of Lady Beatrice.
NORLETT EVANS, Carrie's husband.  An actor.
SAM BREWER, a money lender.  Once horse-whipped by Robert.  Now his chief  creditor.
JOSIAH BARNES, owner of the Green Dragon Inn.  He took Lady Beatrice's  spaniel.
SANDY BAIN, Jockey for Robert.
HARVEY MASON, son of John.
STEPHENS, butler to Robert and Beatrice.
SHOSCOMBE PRINCE, the fastest colt in England.
HALF BRO. TO THE PRINCE, although very similar in appearance to Prince, not  nearly as fleet  of foot.
MERIVALE, of the Yard.  A friend of Holmes.

SUMMARY

Watson is living at Baker St.  A page is on duty.

Shoscombe Old Place came to Lady Beatrice from her late husband.  It reverts to her husband's brother upon her death.

Robert is deeply in debt.  He has placed his entire hope of financial salvation on winning the derby with Shoscomb prince.  He worried about touts and runs the prince's half brother when they are about.  Since the half-brother is much slower, this keeps the odds long on the prince.

Mason comes to Holmes with the story that Robert has been acting strangely.  He has driven Lady Beatrice to drink.  Lady Beatrice never visits the stable anymore and only goes out for an afternoon ride in the presence of her maid.  He gave Beatrice's favorite Spaniel away to Barnes.  He was seen visiting an ancient haunted crypt late at night in the presence of a strange man with a mean yellow face.  He brings Holmes a piece of charred bone which was found in the ashes of the furnace by Harvey.  Watson identifies the bone as part of a human femur.

Holmes ascertains the facts.  Lady Beatrice, who has been extremely ill with heart and kidney disease, dies of natural causes two weeks before the derby.  If Robert let this fact be known, Shoscombe would revert to his brother-in-law and the money lenders would ruin him.  Therefore, he digs up the remains of one of her ancient ancestors from the crypt and buries her there.  He burns the disinterred remains in the furnace.  That's where the femoral fragment came from.  He has Norlett veil himself heavily and impersonate Beatrice on a drive every afternoon accompanied by his wife to carry off the illusion that Beatrice is alive.  The spaniel raises such a fuss that Robert gives him to Barnes.

Shoscombe Prince wins the derby.  Robert pays off his debts and has enough left to situate himself comfortably and the magistrates forgive him for everything.

OTHER ADVENTURES MENTIONED

1. The St. Pancras case.
2. The coiner Holmes ran down by the Zinc and Copper filings in his cuff.

DISGUISES

Holmes and Watson impersonate two fishermen and stay at the Green Dragon.

UNUSUAL DEDUCTIONS & bits

1. Watson likes to bet on the horses.
2. Holmes examines some dust for Merivale, looking for glue - which he finds.
3. Watson is receiving a wound pension.
4. Holmes borrows lady Beatrice's spaniel and turns him loose when the carriage  containing Norlett, posing as Lady Beatrice, is near.  The spaniel quickly  reveals that this is not his master.

Official Abbreviation: SHOS

The Adventure Of Shoscombe Old Place was first published in the Liberty Magazine, March 5th 1927

The Retired Colourman

DRAMATIS PERSONAE

JOSIAH AMBERLY, the retired colourman. 
MRS. AMBERLY, his wife (20 years his junior)
Dr. RAY ERNEST, a chess playing friend of Mr. Amberly
BARKER, another private investigator and friendly rival of Holmes.
MACKINNON, a smart young police officer.

SUMMARY

After he retired from his firm which manufactured paint and artists supplies, Amberly married a beautiful, much younger woman.  He was a miser and made her life miserable with his niggardly ways.

Amberly frequently played chess with Ernest, a man approximately his wife's age.  Ernest and Mrs. Amberly might have had an affair; at least Mr. Amberly thought they did.  Amberly had constructed a "Strong room" inside his house which was much like a bank vault.  He contrived to lock his wife and Dr. Ernest in this room and flood it with natural gas from an adjacent pipe.

Amberly hid the bodies in an abandoned well and faked an elopement.  He called in the police who referred him to Holmes.  Holmes was absorbed in another case and sent Watson to investigate. 

Barker had been hired by Ernest's family to investigate the matter.  Holmes and he crossed paths and continued together.

When confronted by the evidence, Amberly tried to poison himself.

OTHER ADVENTURES MENTIONED

The Case of the two Coptic Patriarchs.

DISGUISES

None

UNUSUAL DEDUCTIONS & bits

1. Amberly was painting the woodwork to hide the smell of natural gas.
2. Holmes sent Watson and Amberly on a wild goose chase and burgled Amberly's  house during his absence.
3. Amberly booked two seats at theatre on the night of the murder, presumably for  he and his wife.  He told Holmes that she had complained of a headache at  the last minute and declined to go but that he went anyway and found them  gone when he returned.  Holmes checked with the theatre and found that  neither seat had been occupied that night.
4. Holmes and Watson attended a vocal concert by Carina.

Official Abbreviation: RETI

The Adventure Of The Retired Colourman was first published in Liberty Magazine, December 18th, 1926
 

Copyright (c) James Hoy, 2002, All Rights Reserved

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